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Beyond the Main Stage: The Videos You Need to Improve Your Next Event

Video is too important to be reserved for key moments in your agenda. Savvy planners are incorporating authentic, short-form content before, during and after their events to drive more registrations, keep attendees engaged, deliver sponsor value, and continue the momentum long after the curtain falls. 

So, how should you be incorporating short form video into your plan? And what factors are most important to creating content that people actually want to watch?

We invited Sam Lembeck, President of Production at See3 Communications and writer and director of a myriad of short form content from commercials and web series to short films, to join Michael Hoffman, CEO of Gather Voices for a live, 1-hour conversation on short form video for events. They’ll discuss:

  • Innovative ways that organizations are working with attendees, sponsors, speakers and more to co-create video content
  • Factors that make short form video content more impactful
  • Real-world examples that have moved the needle for event planners like you

Video Transcript

- Slideshow, here we go, start webinar. Get a message. Okay, so people will be able to join now, and, How are things in Los Angeles, Sam?

- Hot, it's 104 yesterday, summer is here.

- Oh wow. We've had a lot of heat in Chicago, but it's been lovely last few days.

- Really?

- Yeah, when I left, I was in New Orleans for April and May, and by the time we left, it was like.

- Yeah, I bet, that sounds, I had one summer in Chicago and it was rough, because it was so humid.

- Yeah, we will, I'll be in the LA area starting in middle of August.

- For a while?

- For a while, yeah, for like 10 months.

- Oh my God.

- Yeah, it's exciting. All right, we got some folks joining. Hello Linda, hello Chris, hello Gabriel. We will get started very soon. And you grew up in LA, right?

- Yeah. I'm from here. I went to Chicago for four years to go to Columbia College, spent one summer in Chicago. That was enough for me, in the humidity. And then I came back to LA for film school. I did TV stuff at Columbia, and then production here.

- Yeah, Columbia's great, we've had lots of, over the years, I've had lots of interns and partnerships and different things with Columbia.

- Yeah, and it got a lot better even after I left. They've really grown.

- Great. Well hello, Amanda and Celeste and Margaret and Ryan and John, welcome. We're going to get started in just a minute. We're going to give one more minute for folks who are joining, and then we will get started.

- Are they seeing us right now or are they just seeing--

- Yep, they're seeing and hearing us even.

- Good.

- And I know that a lot of people end their meetings or whatever, and have to transition over here. So giving enough to do that.

- Sure, yeah.

- It's good, of course, we're recording this, so that if you miss it or miss some of it, we will send out the recording for everyone, so let's just give it a few more seconds here.

- Sure. I loved living in Chicago. I love, people just love Chicago in Chicago. People are here in LA to do the LA thing, but they don't love it. It felt like a big hometown.

- Yeah, it's funny, I have a friend who just moved to Chicago a couple years ago and he just commented that it's the place he's been where he's seen more people wearing Chicago stuff than in any other city he's ever been in. Chicago shirts, Chicago flags, Chicago hats, and I think that's true.

- Yeah, I really like that. Because that energy is not like it here. People aren't like, "I love my town, I love my this." They love the Dodgers and the Lakers, and that's pretty much it, about. Like, "I'm trying to make it here, I'm trying to do this."

- Ah, interesting. Well, you folks in the chat, is that true of your hometowns? Do people love it in your hometowns? Well, we can, it's a couple minutes past the hour, so we're going to get started. Welcome, everyone, to "Beyond the Main Stage: "the Videos You Need to Improve Your Next Event." So it's a conversation with me, Michael Hoffman, and Sam Lembeck. For those of you who don't know me, I'm Michael Hoffman, I'm the CEO and co-founder at Gather Voices. I founded an agency called See3 Communications that Sam is at now, I don't work there anymore. I passed the baton to a group of amazing folks doing great work, but See3 is an agency that works with social good organizations, nonprofits, associations, and the like, to tell powerful stories using internet and video, and so we're going to talk about that, And so, I'm really pleased to welcome Sam. Sam, I'd love you to introduce yourself. I think you have this mix of commercial and entertainment production world. So doing things that the expectation is that thousands, hundreds of thousands, or even millions of people would watch, but you also do work for small and medium-sized organizations, telling powerful stories. So tell us a little bit how you got into that, and a little bit about your journey.

- Sure, well, hi everybody. Thanks for having me, Michael. So my dad is in the industry. He is a director, and I kind of grew up on a set, on his sets, sort of just hanging out, and I didn't really know what I wanted to do for a very long time, but I knew I wanted to do something in the business. So when after high school, I went to Columbia College in Chicago, and I went to their TV Broadcast Journalism School, because you could do a little of everything there, and I got familiar with shooting and editing. They make you just get your hands dirty and everything. And while I was there, I was really finding my way in the editing world. The editing suites at Columbia College in Chicago were also used as teaching suites for Avid editing, which is the premier system that editors use. So I got to really learn on some great material. And as I was there, I was figuring out that I was liking my film school friends and how they were communicating about story, and analyzing movies and things like that. And I decided to come back to LA, well, I would've gone to New York, if they had accepted me at NYU, I'm not bitter. So I got into USC film school, graduate school, and I did the film school thing. I focused in directing because I was enjoying working with actors and working with the camera. And that was a great experience. And from there I made, you make a thesis project when you're in the grad school, and I made a short film and that did not send me on a path to directing feature films. I thought for some reason that you get into this school, you obviously become an award-winning director. So that didn't happen. I learned a lot, but I found myself hustling, finding production assistant jobs, anything I could get, and while I was doing these sort of menial kind of jobs, I was making short films with friends, and making short films and video things, and, YouTube was really happening at the time, beginning, and web series were happening. I was able to sort of make anything I want, and put it on the internet and get feedback. So, I was just keeping myself busy and having fun doing that, and through connections, I found myself on a TV show called Rizzoli and Isles, which was on TNT. I was the head writer producer's assistant for a while. And then eventually I was able to write episodes of the show, which was an amazing experience. I wasn't expecting to be a writer. I didn't feel myself, I didn't expect to be doing that, but it was amazing, and I was able to write episodes, and then I'm on set while they're filming them, and I'm giving feedback and I'm watching, shadowing the directors and watching them work. So I really learned a lot doing that, and got into the Writer's Guild, which was cool. And then that show got canceled after about seven years, and I was back to making my own stuff again. And I connected with an old friend of mine, Norman, who you know, who was running a marketing agency, and he needed somebody to run his video operation. And so he and I started working together, and a lot of my technical knowledge and storytelling knowledge mixed well with his marketing knowledge and knowhow, and for the last, I don't know, six years or so, we've been doing anything from interviews to personal stories, to tour videos, to events, videos for events, and we have just been doing a little of everything that anybody might need, to promote themself or themselves or their organizations. And it's been, it's been great. It's not what I was expecting to be doing, but, I'm still able to tell people stories or tell their organization's stories, and I've learned a lot about things that I didn't know I'd be learning about, in as far as the type of organizations and stuff, and we've been working together at See3, and working with a bunch of great organizations there too, and here we are.

- Yeah, well, excellent, that's a great journey. I actually remember watching Rizzoli and Isles. Wasn't it a Canadian production, or was it?

- No, it was--

- I don't know why I thought it was shot in Toronto or something.

- Well, a lot of stuff is shot there, you're not far off.

- Got it.

- It was shot here, took place in Boston. The set, I mean, but we shot it in Los Angeles.

- And Los Angeles can be anywhere.

- It can be, yeah.

- That's right, the magic of television. Well, great, I know some of you are here to earn CAE credit, that's awesome. If you are, you need to stay to the end. I will have a poll at the end, asking you if you want CAE credit, and that's how we will track your credit certificate. The other way we know you're here to really learn is to participate in the chat, so I'm going to have a couple polls. We're going to ask some questions. We'll love to participate, I think, we have our experience, at Gather Voices, we're working with about 150 organizations. So I've seen a lot of things around video. Sam's working with dozens of organizations on video projects and sees things, but you have your own learnings and stuff, and we are not the sum total of all the information in the world. So we'd love for you to share your links, your stories, your things you're doing as well. That would be awesome, so, I actually want to start with a poll and we're going to be talking about video at events, so I want to know, when you have live events, are you capturing video at those events? And so waiting for y'all to do that. If you are, if you say yes, you are capturing video events, just write a couple words in the chat about what kind of video are you collecting? Are you collecting, is the video you're collecting recording sessions? Is that what you're doing? Are you doing interviews, are you getting testimonials? Are you getting B-roll of the conference? What kind of things--

- Just stick a camera in the back, and just getting a wide shot of the whole state?

- Yeah, of a whole session or hour long sessions, or streaming them, what do you, what do we mean? Obviously, capturing video at events can mean a lot of different things. So please, add to the chat. So Ty says "We record the entire meeting." So you mean all the sessions of the meeting, and then those go, where do those go? So if you record sessions like Amanda and Ty, in the meeting, where do you put, d'you just put those online, or is that part of a hybrid strategy, or what do you do with that? Shannon says, "Testimonials and B-roll, "and sometimes full sessions." Rebecca says, "B-roll and testimonials." And are the testimonials about, those of you who do testimonials, are those about your organization, or about the event, or both? I think sometimes you think, well, people are at the event. They can talk about why they're excited to be at the event. We can use that to market next year's event, but it's also, oh, these are people who are part of our organization. We could actually collect content that we use for other things, not just for the event promotion. So, love to hear about that as well. Celeste says, "Our prevention summit "goes to the YouTube page." So that's interesting. "So people who are not there can watch, "so a bunch of sessions around on demand," thanks, Ty. Are you finding the poll? Let me share the results. So it's most of you, the vast majority, are capturing video at live events, and let me stop sharing. Oh, and so, and then I'm going to just stop sharing my screen for a second. So when you, so let's see, Victoria says, "Sessions, presentations, interviews, testimonials." So tell us about testimonials. We know that testimonials are a big thing that people collect at events. If you collect testimonials, can you share with us some of what those testimonials are about? If you have any links to those testimonials, you can share those as well. What do you find, Sam, about testimonial videos in general, that are powerful? And particularly today, in the world that we live in, why are testimonials so important?

- Well, for me personally, I will sometimes take a testimonial over a Yelp review, for example, it's easier to see someone's real response rather than something that was easy to just type in on their phone. You get more of a sense about, a more authentic sense of someone's reaction to something or somebody's opinion on something. So for me, it's as simple as that.

- Yeah, I think one of the things we've seen also is, that in a world where trust in institutions has gone down, that these peer comments are just much more powerful, that you can say, "This event's amazing." But if you say, if you have somebody that's just like you in the same position that says, "I wasn't sure I wanted to go, "but I went and it was really powerful, "and I got all this out of it." That's going to just have more influence than the kind of institutional top down messaging today. And we definitely see that across the board in so many things, that that peer influence has power.

- I agree, and it's something you can use in a multitude of ways, you can use it to promote your next event or saying how much fun people had at the last one, or, you can send it out shortly after the event to talk about how much fun people had, for the people who missed it or want to learn more about it.

- Right, and have you, I want to talk a little bit about your work in the world of associations, nonprofits and the like, when you're doing a commercial production, you obviously can cast a wide net literally and have, you know, casting, and find exactly the person that you want to play the role that you want. When we talk about organizations, well, the president is the president of the organization, and they may be good on camera, and they may not be good on camera, right? And then when we talk about members or people giving testimonials, or participants or people who've gotten service from an organization, whatever it is that you want.

- Yeah.

- On the one hand, you're at the mercy of who they bring you. And on the other hand, there's probably lots of people in those communities who are maybe more engaging than they ever knew.

- Yeah.

- How have you found that, about finding people and then how do you work with those people to bring out the, obviously it's different, right? They're not getting paid to do it in the way that you would on a commercial set. So how has that transition been, and how do you get the most out of the kind of amateur sharing their story?

- Sure, well, it's a little bit of, I think you have to ask for more than you need, as far as being able to craft something that is powerful. So I worked an event recently that was all material gathered through Gather Voices, and a lot of it was hard to watch. A lot of people are not familiar with filming themselves, even if it's just sitting in front of a computer, but because we asked so many people to send material, we were able to pick and choose stuff that worked for the video, so, and it wasn't necessarily that people, the quality of people's cameras or sound was bad, Because you can help that stuff in editing if need be, but it's more about finding the people who are able to give a good story or give good feedback and if you can work hard enough to get, and fast enough to get people to send you material, you can put together something really meaningful, and you don't need your one person who's great in front of a camera to do it. You can get real people talking about their real experiences or talking about how excited they are, or talking about what they know about your organization, or your thing, and that really translates more. That can translate more than some actor who sounds good. Someone who's passionate about something is going to read.

- Yeah, that's interesting. I think what we've seen with testimonials being really important that sometimes, the old traditional way of having a camera crew setting up in a room with the perfect blue background and the perfect lighting and the perfect sound, it feels, and only a handful of people who can go through that because of the setup time and all of that, that it feels very artificial, and it doesn't resonate in the same way where people today are just used to watching amateur video in a completely different way. They see it every single day, people are watching video on Instagram and TikTok and everything else. And so having a regular person share their story in more of an authentic way, often resonates with people. And what's interesting to me also is that there's a aspect when you ask a large amount of people to share their story, there's an aspect of casting in that, right? Which is you don't necessarily have to use all those stories. You can use the ones that are great, but more than that, now, you know who those people are. And if you're going to do something with that professional camera crew, you have a much better list of people that you know can articulate your mission well, or you know that their story's really compelling, and you would never know that. So if you think about you're an association, and you have hundreds, hundreds of thousands potentially of members, how do you know, there's absolutely rock stars among those members, but unless you're asking lots of people to share their story, you'll never know who they are.

- That's right, and I would even say, on our more professionally produced videos, a lot of the time, what we do is, we will book two days of interviews. And instead of having somebody talk about the organization, we'll get the people who work at the company and we'll just film them and ask a lot of them the same questions. We'll ask them, we'll just repeat it and get the best answers from all the people, and because we're asking interview style questions, instead of somebody just saying something that's prepared, it just feels more authentic. And it really can make something meaningful that people believe, even if it's well produced material, it has the same, you can get the same, as long as you're having people talk from the heart.

- Right. I want to just take a couple minutes and go through some general information around video for events that I think can give you a little bit of level setting. We're seeing video driving long-term engagement around events by including it, not just in the event itself, but before and after as well. And so the ability to collect video and use video pre-event is often great for pre-event marketing. So having folks, for example, build video collection into their registration, so people, especially like early bird registration, people saying, "What are you excited about?" And they're sharing what they're excited about. Well, those are the best promotion videos for the event. Having speaker videos in advance saying, here's what my session's going to be about. Here's why it's going to be exciting. Those are really valuable as well. So you can drive a lot of interest in an event by including content.

- Way better than just a headshot of someone that's like, this person's going to be at an event. Oh, let's see what this person looks like two weeks out or a month out, and see.

- Yeah, exactly, and it feels like, well, I don't know who this person is really. I don't know what their qualifications are. I don't know if they're a great speaker. And if you can give me a little bit of that, that's just going to get me excited about it. And then collecting content at events, obviously there's lots of ways to do that. With the picture here in the middle's the Gather Voices video kiosk, where we can collect, I don't know, 50, 50 videos in a day, for example, for MPI, the Meeting Professionals International, and you can do it with camera crews, you can do it iPhones. You can do it lots of different ways to collect content at events, and that content can be testimonials about the events, but it can also be educational content, right? One of the interesting pedagogical things that we've seen is when you have somebody present a session and people afterwards are asked, tell me what your big takeaway was. Well, they're going to interpret that session through their own work in a way that could be really helpful to others, and so being able to do that, it's also a way to bridge the gap a bit between these virtual events and hybrid events and in person events, so people who aren't there, being able to get some of the learnings from the people who are there is interesting. And then post-event, being able to use that content that you collected pre- and during, to keep people connected and keep the momentum going from that.

- Yeah.

- And is that, go ahead?

- I would totally agree. And I would even, I don't know if this is the next slide, but, and even for your next event, the material you filmed at the event is useful.

- Yeah, 100%, I think being able to have people see that experience and share that experience, I think that's why some folks mention they collect B-roll, which is just those shots that can be used later. And I'm sure Sam, as a professional editor as well, when you go into a project and somebody has more content, I mean, I guess to a point, they could maybe have too much content, but the idea if they come and they say, "We've got all this B-roll of the event," that's just going to give you as an editor a lot more choices of how to make something compelling, right?

- Yeah, and what is the typical way to do that is to talk with the client and see what they want to say about their event. "I want this event to feel this," and "I want it to be that, and it's important "that people know about this." And then we're able to look at all this footage that they have in media and craft whatever it is they want to say, based on what they want to say, use the material that they have to really portray the message they want to share. So getting that footage is great, even if it can feel overwhelming to the company, like, "We have all this stuff, "I don't know what to do with it." If you go back and think about what it is you want to say, and then you can sort of work from there and not be so afraid of the big pile in front of you.

- Yeah, one thing I'm curious about, how you deal with this. One thing that we see a lot of Gather Voices clients doing more and more is using Gather Voices as a store place for their content so that you can organize this content, Because if you collect 10 different B-roll videos, where do you put that? If they're on your phone, you gotta get them off your phone because they're just going to be somewhere. And sometimes it's like, they're not just somewhere, they're everywhere. There's content on hard drives, there's content on YouTube, there's content on whatever, and then they go to somebody like you and they're like, "We don't even know what we have, it's all over the place." And so that organization thing becomes a useful bit of a little bit of extra time, right? Like a marginal amount of extra time saves a massive amount of time later on.

- For sure, and, so if you're using, when you're using Gather Voices, it helps you see all the material you have, and then once it's all in front of you, you are be better able to communicate to whomever on your team is going to be editing. Or if you're going to hire a person like See3 or something, you say we have all this stuff, even if it's a 30 minute clip of someone walking around the room, and it's just one piece of footage, this is a part where he is walking around the room, but it's got a lot of useful pieces. But these are the ideas that we're thinking about, as far as what we want to say, just look and look for something in there. That's definitely enough information to give to an editor or a person that's editing.

- And that would be, if you don't have a tool like Gather Voices is, if you're the editor, you'd welcome a spreadsheet with links to each file or something, right?

- Yeah.

- I mean, just some organization is better than nothing, right?

- Absolutely. Yes, I have worked with clients that have done both. Having links is great, having your footage in a Google Drive is great, having a Dropbox, anything that you can share in either a Google spreadsheet to the person and say like, "We like these clips," or, "This has some stuff over here," being organized is so important to being able to work on your, whatever it is you're working on. I see a question that came in, Because I have my little question and answer window, says, what are your tips for getting good B-roll?

- Yeah, yeah, I'd love to hear what you think about that.

- Sure.

- [Michael] What makes good B-roll?

- What makes good B-roll? Well, what makes bad B-roll is shakiness.

- Let's define B-roll for some folks. Because I know that us who come from the video world,

- Got it, okay.

- Use that term all the time.

- Yeah, yeah, yeah.

- What do we mean by B-roll?

- Okay, so let's just use an event, like a in-person event, for example, you're going to have people speaking, or you're going to have these sessions, and that is something you're going to use as a promotional tool, or you're going to put the whole thing online eventually. B-roll is footage of people walking in, or it's extra footage of the event, someone walking in, a shot of someone signing the ledger, checking in, or it's a shot of the sign outside of the conference hall that says, this is the Gather Voices event of 2022. It's a shot of two people getting their water and talking before the event, it's someone in the crowd asking a question, and the person responding on stage laughing, all that extra stuff is B-roll.

- And the theory there is that people, if it's a longer clip in particular, people don't want to just watch a talking head for 30 minutes or whatever.

- That's right.

- When you cut other imagery in front of that, that talk track, you will actually just keep the viewer's attention more. So having a variety of shots that you can use and it's called B-roll, right? Because the A-roll would be the thing with the sound, and the B-roll.

- That sounds right. I don't actually know for certain why, but that sounds right, like you have your A camera shooting the actual event, your B camera shooting the extras.

- [Michael] Right.

- Don't quote me on that, but it sounds good enough, so for today we can buy that.

- So at an event, the kind of B-roll you mentioned would be like the outside of the venue, the walking in, people doing some things. The booze, all the different things that you would want to have to give somebody a feel for it.

- And I would say that you can hire a crew to do these kinds of things, hire a person to film in the back, but you don't necessarily always have to. A good piece of B-roll, you can hold your phone horizontally, not up and down, but horizontal because it's going to look, if you want to be a bit more professional, that's the way you should be filming these videos. It's not to say shooting vertically for social media is not important, but if for longer pieces or a more professional look, you hold your phone sideways and you can literally just walk around. And I would just recommend taking your time and counting to 10 on every time you film something, because if you're just going like this or going like that, it's going to just be shaky and it's not going to work in the things you're editing. So, if you're not going to have a tripod for your phone or you'd want to just walk around, I would just say count to 10 on everything, someone's signing in, just be as still as you can, and you can get really good stuff, you don't have to be scared or you don't have to worry about not having a professional person with a 4K camera, because at the end of the day, this is all going to get turned into something you post on your website or your YouTube.

- And you don't even have to worry about the background noise or anything there, right? Because 99% of the time, you're not going to use the sync sound, the sound that's in that video. You're just going to use the video clip on top of some other sound, right.

- That's right, so at the end of the day, when you or your team or the person you hire is editing it, they will use the soundbite from the person speaking at your event as the main audio. And they'll take the audio away from the two people, and the crowd of people around you, where they're drinking their coffee in the morning, or getting their nametag as they walk in.

- Right, I've seen a couple techniques that I don't know if you like or feel cliche at this point. But I see, for example, doing something close up to something happening and then slowly panning out, where people can see the context of it.

- Sure.

- That's a shot I've seen in B-roll that works, another one is starting with people's hands or feet. I know some organizations that work with children or medical things, and they don't want to necessarily show the faces of people or they have restrictions around those. Get around that by showing the feet of lots of people walking into something, or hands signing in or doing something, techniques like that.

- I mean, you have to think, if I was just taking photos of this event, how would I want to tell the story of what happened? If I was walking around with a still camera, it's like, "Oh, look, there's people walking in, "oh, look, they're walking in, let's get their feet. "Oh, this is a really big space. "Let me walk really back, "really far back, and take a wide photo." You're just doing the same thing, but, counting to 10 and keeping your phone steady. Another fun thing to do, if you have an extra camera or phone, is just sticking it on a tripod or leaning it against the wall somewhere, and getting there early, before the room fills up, and just lock setting your camera, just so you can go from an empty room to a full room just to show, you can speed up that clip. So it populates and is just a good, useful tool to show people how, it's a shot.

- Yeah, that's great. We definitely have some clients at Gather Voices where the video request is an internal one for staff, and it's basically a shot list. It says, get people's feet, get the booth, get the food station, get whatever. And so then, let's say you could have 10 people on staff who, it's like, "Hey, check out the shot list, get what you can." And then the quantity of potential B-roll is just so much greater than you get with a crew. You're going to get all kinds of things at different times a day and different people and different perspectives and.

- Absolutely, yeah, and everybody's got the movies that they've seen or the shots that they like, that they don't even know that they know, and they might do that shot that you mentioned where they start on some hands and pan up to the room. So getting people to do that is a great idea.

- [Michael] Yeah.

- Free.

- Yeah, the horizontal, so we have a comment thanking you for that, I know it took me a long time to be okay with vertical video, as somebody who's done professional production, I always feel like, "Oh my God," when phones first came out and we know that today, if you're doing TikTok or you're doing Instagram or other things, and that's why we built into Gather Voices actually cropping ability, because we know you may have that horizontal, the traditional video, 16/9 video. But you want to put it on Instagram? Well, you can crop it to four by three, and it's going to look really good on Instagram. And so there are things you can do in post, and I think the point is that you have a lot more versatility if you shoot horizontal.

- Yes, it is harder to go backwards from, it's harder to go from vertical to horizontal, because you're locked into shooting this much of me, just look at the shot of me right now. If you only shot this much and you blocked off, let me see, if you only shot this much, you can't stretch it out, it's going to be a thin shot of me. But if you were to shoot it wide screen like this, you could then just crop off these side parts and still use it vertically as needed. Always put a title card right here and use it for this shot or for this shot. And it's a habit that nobody is in, and it's just the nature of things. And there's always way to fix stuff. If everybody's shot vertically, it's fine. But it looks weird when you're on a wide screen putting a piece of vertical footage. So that's a new--

- Yeah, and I think people, again, depending on what you're doing with the montage creator in the Gather Voices tool, now I've seen lots of people who have five shots, one of them happens to be vertical and you want to use it, Because it's a really great story. And so we enable you to have blurred sides to that. And it's not ideal, right, it's not the same, but in a montage kind of mix of things, that feels really authentic, it's not a deal killer in the way that maybe it would've been 10 years ago.

- For sure.

- This looks terrible, today, you'd be like, "Oh yeah," people are used to seeing that. You see it on the news, you see it everywhere. So not your ideal, but you can use it, right?

- Yeah, for sure.

- I want to get to some examples. I want just run through really quickly, a couple things and we could show some videos Because I think talking about some videos would be helpful. So, we've gotten, I think Kaitlan could put in the chat some different links to things if people want to see them. But, we'll show a couple examples. But the idea of before the event, using a video for getting introductions for promoting the event, for the speaker sessions that we talked about during the event, having a variety of kinds of things, we talked about B-roll and those kind of attendee insights, that's really good, but also the awards. So that's something we see in a lot of events, is awards. And there are lots of opportunities within awards to get people who are getting the awards, get people to talk about the people who got the awards, all of that. We were just at one of our clients' ExhibitorLive, just did something in their Las Vegas conference where every time somebody won an award on stage, they went up on stage, they got their award, you know how they step aside and they get a picture taken with the award. And then the third thing was to go right to the kiosk and record their award video. And every single person did it, because it wasn't an afterthought request. It was like the third place you are brought to after that award. And now they have all this social content with the award winners that they can use and put on their website and do, and it was a really marginal additional effort, because they already have the people, they already have the situation, they already have the award, they're not building something around making video. They're just adding video to something that they're already doing, and then we talked about after, as well. So the idea of testimonials, feedback of sponsors. So that's another thing is, there's a lot of challenge around getting sponsor value. So being able to let sponsors have some more post event real estate is another way to continue to add value, and then, what's on the right, lead generating video gallery. So the idea that you can let people meet sponsors even when the event's over is something that we've seen. I want to see, let's answer that one. So we answered that question and then, I want to just show a couple examples. So this, oh, now I'm getting this thing, video can't be loaded again. Let's see if it can be loaded now, new. That is so strange, I'm going to just stop sharing for a second and see, reload the deck here and show you all videos. So, I just wanted to show a couple examples where videos were used really well. So this is Windy Christner, who's from the American Pharmacists Association, and I see clearly am having issues playing the videos. So, and I do not know why. This is the second time that I've had that.

- [Kaitlan] Michael, I can share my screen?

- Yeah, that would be great. And we'll have to troubleshoot, thanks, Kaitlan.

- [Kaitlan] Here you go

- So this is Wendy Christner.

- [Kaitlan] Sorry, Michael, could you hear it when it was playing?

- Yeah, I think so.

- Okay, you want to introduce it, or you want me to just--

- So I can introduce it. This is Wendy from the Pharmacists' Association, and they wanted to do something to welcome people who were coming from different countries to their event. And so they had this idea, and it was really super easy to execute, but had a real emotional impact for the attendees.

- Yeah, that I actually came up with when I was--

- I'm not surprised.

- When I stayed awake one night, just wondering how in the world am I going to get engagement on a computer with my members and what can I possibly do that is interesting and entertaining a little bit. So I reached out to our team members, and I put a call out there to all the staff and I said, "Hey, anybody speak a second, third language? "Let's welcome everybody in various languages." So that's what we used Gather Voices for, and it got great reviews.

- National Mall, Washington, DC. APHA 2021 Virtual.

- National Mall, Washington DC.

- APHA 2021 Virtual. 2021 Virtual. National Mall.

- National Mall.

- So anyway, that was so easy, and it made the staff feel more involved. And yeah, that was a lot of fun to do.

- So, that's an example where again, doing something where all of those attendees speak English, but just by recognizing them in that way has a real emotional impact, and something that every organization can do really easily. And I think they started with staff, asking if staff had these skills, and that actually got staff more excited as well.

- Yeah, I mean, it just put a smile on my face, and that's the kind of thing where you can just tell they're passionate about what they're, even though they're just saying, "Hello," they're passionate and that totally translates and makes you smile and engages you.

- Yeah, exactly. The next video, Kaitlan, I think that we can, let's show that, and then the one after that, we will skip, but this is an example where ASAE, which is the American Society of Association Executives, they had a conference, they collected videos at the conference, and then they were able to turn around those videos into a montage in the next morning to send out to the attendees, thanking them for coming. And I think we saw another client of ours, the fundraising, Association of Fundraising Professionals, where they did the same thing, but they had a multi-day conference and they used, before the plenary session, they'd have like a two minute montage of what happened in the day before at the conference. So, the tools Sam, right, have just gotten so much easier to collect and turn things around.

- If you can budget that in your schedule to get somebody to spend one hour just going, making that, it makes you look like you've got your stuff together. And it doesn't take a lot to get that.

- Yeah, exactly, so let's see a little bit of this.

- Hi, I'm Anikia Brown, the Marketing and Communications Manager at the National League for Nursing, and I am attending for the first time ASAE MSC and I will have to say that it has been such an impactful event. I've learned so much, and I especially appreciated being around so many different association professionals who share same passion as me in marketing communications, and attending all the several sessions, mostly on membership engagement, marketing engagement, volunteer engagement, so many things to take away. I'm so excited to be able to learn so much and have such a great experience.

- Hi, I'm Andrew Riley. I'm with the International Foodservice Distributors Association, and I'm a returning attendee to MMCC, and this has been a great show. One thing I think that's been very valuable is putting together workforce toolkits to help our members better recruit the next generation, increase diversity.

- We can stop it here. I want to point out, this was done, obviously, in the exhibit hall. You can hear all the noise behind it, and that's mitigated for the viewer by having the captions there, but it also just gives a sense of a very vibrant place, that it's happening, and so that's the kind of trade off of not having the ideal sound, but giving a sense of like, wow, sounds like there's a lot of people there.

- Was that shot with the Gather Voices kiosk?

- Yes.

- Yeah, it's good, and there's prompts on there, so people don't just have to come up with something.

- Yeah, it's not talk about anything you want to talk about, it's, answer this question.

- Yeah.

- It's a lot, it's a lot easier for people to do that. And I think once you start to see people standing in line to do it, that also brings other people over, willing to participate.

- People just love being in front of a camera, some people don't.

- Well, I'd love to turn to, well, our next video, which I'll just talk about for a second, Kaitlan, but we'll skip the watching. It was an event promotion video and was just a really simple video. We can put the link to that in the chat, if anybody wants to watch it. But what was so interesting to me was, they put a thumbnail of this video in there, and it increased the clickthroughs in their pre-event email by 300%. So that just shows you, it's not about Gather Voices. It's not about tools, it's whatever, but when people have a choice between a big block of text and a video, a thumbnail with a play button, they're going to click on that thumbnail with a play button a lot more often than they're going to click on some text link. And so putting a speaker intro video in your pre-event email, putting your event director, talking about why it's going to be exciting, whatever you've got, you're going to get more engagement on that video content than you are on this big text. And we just don't see enough of it. I mean the 300% more clickthroughs, right? Three X their clickthroughs on the email with the video. That's incredible, and it was so easy, so easy to do. And I'm like, why isn't everybody doing this? And it's because I don't know, they don't know about it. And hopefully, hopefully now they do, but I'm sure you're seeing that, Sam, just that the video in general just gets so much more engagement.

- Yeah, absolutely. We try to, even with our marketing stuff, whether it's an event or not, having a video in there is just another tool to get engagement, for certain, yeah.

- Well, I'd love to see an example, Sam, we could show an example of something that you worked on. I know one of the clients that you've done a lot of work for is Friendly House. Will you tell us a little bit about who they are, what the circumstances are, and sort of what messaging they're trying to get out?

- Yeah, well, Friendly House is a women's rehabilitation center. They've got 12 beds, it's a small treatment center in Los Angeles that does detox, rehab and sober living. And they're a nonprofit and don't have a lot of money to spend, and so we give them, at a very discounted rate, we do some basic promotional stuff for them. They have a gala fundraiser video once, a fundraiser in person, once a year. And we usually do like a big fundraising video for that, whether it's fundraising or just something to tug at the heartstrings and get the message out that this is a place that helps people. And they rely on donors primarily to sponsor people. So they don't have to spend money, Because a lot of people don't have money if they're, well this is a place that takes a lot of people that don't have a lot of money. You can def certainly spend a lot of money on treatment if you have the money, but they take women in and we try to get that message across to get more donations for them.

- Yeah, that's interesting, and one of the big mistakes that nonprofits often make is they show something amazing, amazing program, but the viewer's response to that emotionally is, what does it have to do with me? And if you don't tell that piece of the story, which is, we need you and here's why, you never get the action that you want. And, so that needs to be in the story. So let's Kaitlan, if you can help us take a look, that would be great.

- I was there, that's the first time I went to it, was Betty Ford and Carol Burnett, and Carol Burnett's daughter had just gotten, trying to get sober. Everything was pretty new in treatment back then. And there weren't any friendly houses, but Friendly House.

- We're talking about an organization that was started in 1951. It's the first women's residential home in the United States, back in a time when, if women had a drug and alcohol problem, they were pretty much thrown in a nut house.

- And I think about two years ago, two or three years ago, we started to make the transition from a sober living to a treatment center.

- I think people still don't understand our business model; I think that people think that we are a shelter, which we're not, that we're free, which we're not, and don't understand that we are a full blown rehab treatment facility for women.

- I offer them individual sessions as well as a recovery group, every week. I give the women the chance, so that they can learn how to self regulate their emotions.

- The groups utilize connection exercises. I think they help people get more in touch with their sense of identity, their connection with the others, but also themselves as well.

- Aside from the process groups and life skills groups, we do things like art and yoga and breath works and equine therapy. And it shows them there are different things that they can spend.

- Yeah, thanks. So this is great, I love just being able to get a sense of the whole thing and what they do. And obviously, when you have somebody who has an Australian accent, that always helps video.

- Yeah, and with that kind of thing, like we were saying earlier, what we did was just, we interviewed these people to talk about, just asked them questions about what they did. And we just pulled the best, most authentic clips. None of those people's had, none of those people had anything prepared. They were just talking, they were answering questions about what they do. And you can do that, whether it's professionally shot or not, you can get those kinds of answers from the Gather Voices kiosk, or holding up a camera and interviewing someone. If you shoot enough, you can really make anything.

- Right, one of the things that stands out to me in that clip was also the music. And so will you talk a little about music, the role of music in these kinds of clips, and how you think about music. How does music not drown things out, and what does it serve, what purpose does it serve?

- I mean, the music really needs to support the tone you're trying to set. It is not a simple thing to find the right piece of music, but the right piece of music can really add an emotional element to the words that are coming from people's mouths. They definitely work together. Somebody speaking, just something as simple, just delivering some facts can be really heightened by the right piece of music, and if you can get it together, it can really elevate your content. And nowadays copyright free music, royalty free music, is so cheap, there are subscriptions you can have. I know, I think, I don't know if Gather Voices has some in their platform.

- Yeah, we do. We've got like 30 clips you can choose from without any additional--

- Yeah, and I wouldn't, it's not mandatory, but it is essential to helping portray a really meaningful piece.

- Yeah. And sometimes people don't even notice it, right? But it creates some emotional layer.

- Absolutely.

- That's doing it. I want to take a second to just have another quick poll, and we talk a lot about lifting up the voices of your attendees, your members, your donors, your staff, and we call that co-creation. So, I want to know how challenging it is for you all to co-create video content with your community and, are you feeling that it's challenging? And I think Sam, I think one of the things is just about the paradigm we need to shift, right? Like you were just saying, you could take your iPhone and you could do some stuff, you could get B-roll, and part of it is we just have a sense of a way of doing things, like when somebody says video, it's all of a sudden, it's big video project. There's no other kind of video in most people's minds and it doesn't have to be like that.

- No, your example about the email that gets sent out that gets over 300% engagement, that doesn't need to be a very produced video. It can one clip, but it's another tool. It can really be one shot. If you're overwhelmed by the editing process, you don't have to do that much. It's just, doing something is better than nothing. if you're in--

- Yeah, so just sharing the results here, definitely skewing to the more challenging side of things.

- And there's so many tools.

- I think, and it's also a skillset issue, right? I think about something like websites, when in 1995, if I told you that your organization would have a website, you might have, if you didn't in 1995, you'd say probably, Because you see where the world's going. But if I told you you'd have a whole group of people whose job was just to maintain and work on your website, you would say that's insane. Where are we going to get those people? And how would we afford those people? And, I think video is in that category now. We need more skill set. We need, when we're hiring people in our communications and marketing, we need people who not necessarily are professionals at all, but just have the aptitude and interest to do some of the things that we just talked about.

- Yeah, no question, and it's definitely becoming easier and easier to find people that are capable of that. It's like, when you used to put out job requests to hire people, you'd be like, must know Microsoft Word, must know this. You can just add things like, would be great if you knew simple editing skills, that is easy to do.

- Right, right, and there's new tools all the time that are just making things easier. Chris shares that they do a monthly two minute video called "Nugget of Knowledge," I love that. And it's done by Zoom, right? So that's something like a tool that we all know how to use. We're doing it right now. We're having a conversation on Zoom, we're recording on Zoom. And so the idea that you can't add video content in some way in different ways is clearly not true anymore.

- Yeah, and you know, it's okay to feel like it's not easy because it can feel not easy, but a little bit, you can find the help and make it happen. It's definitely out there and much easier than it used to be, so you just not let the fear hold onto you.

- Yeah, well, I'm going to run the poll for the CAE credit, but in the meantime, here's your information, Sam. I think if people have questions and want to reach out to you and get some of your expertise in what they're doing, I assume they can just do that.

- Yeah, no problem. I'd be happy to talk to anybody, give some advice, whatever anybody needs. I'm around sitting at my desk, doing a lot of editing. We're filming out in the real world stuff all the time, but, this is my home base right here.

- Excellent.

- If I didn't have this drop sheet behind me, you would see lots of gear and material behind me, this is where I live.

- Yeah, no, that's terrific. And I assume with COVID restrictions having changed now, that you're out much more and thinking much more about the mix of virtual and in person, and being able to do in person shoots in a way that was that really not possible, pretty recently.

- Yeah, it's nice, it's nice. You can, even if you're still doing virtual events, there's a lot more options for getting material to use in them.

- Well, we're at time, thank you all, who wanted your CAE, we'll process that for you. Thank you for your nice comments, Ty and Chris and Ryan, and Sam, thank you so much for taking time out of your day to share these tips and introduce yourself to this community, appreciate your work. And I would say, I am glad that you are not spending all your time making entertainment content, but you're helping the amazing organizations that do important work, like Friendly House, tell powerful stories, so I think that's good for humanity and appreciate it.

- Thank you, yeah, it's fun to do that stuff.

- All right, everyone have a fantastic rest of your day.

- All right, bye, Michael.